Scene at MIT: Learning ikebana during IAP

February 07, 2024

Since 1988, Hiroko Matsuyama, a master instructor of the Ohara School of Ikebana, has worked with MIT students on the basics of the ancient art of Japanese flower arrangement. Through an Independent Activities Period (IAP) course offered each year by the MIT-Japan Program, Matsuyama works with students to create their own arrangements. This year marked the final IAP ikebana course for Matsuyama, who is stepping down. At the conclusion of this year's course, representatives from the MIT-Japan Program presented Matsuyama with a certificate of appreciation. “These workshops I’ve taught at MIT have been a treasure to me,” says Matsuyama.

Since 1988, Hiroko Matsuyama, a master instructor of the Ohara School of Ikebana, has worked with MIT students on the basics of the ancient art of Japanese flower arrangement. Through an Independent Activities Period (IAP) course offered each year by the MIT-Japan Program, Matsuyama works with students to create their own arrangements.

This year marked the final IAP ikebana course for Matsuyama, who is stepping down. At the conclusion of this year's course, representatives from the MIT-Japan Program presented Matsuyama with a certificate of appreciation.

“These workshops I’ve taught at MIT have been a treasure to me,” says Matsuyama. “It made me feel more global and become more worldly.”

The source of this news is from Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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