New study uses machine learning to bridge the reality gap in quantum devices

January 11, 2024

Functional variability is presumed to be caused by nanoscale imperfections in the materials that quantum devices are made from. Since there is no way to measure these directly, this internal disorder cannot be captured in simulations, leading to the gap in predicted and observed outcomes. To address this, the research group used a “physics-informed” machine learning approach to infer these disorder characteristics indirectly. This was based on how the internal disorder affected the flow of electrons through the device. Although the real device still has greater complexity than the model can capture, our study has demonstrated the utility of using physics-aware machine learning to narrow the reality gap.’The study 'Bridging the reality gap in quantum devices with physics-aware machine learning’ has been published in Physical Review X.

Associate Professor Natalia Ares.

Functional variability is presumed to be caused by nanoscale imperfections in the materials that quantum devices are made from. Since there is no way to measure these directly, this internal disorder cannot be captured in simulations, leading to the gap in predicted and observed outcomes.

To address this, the research group used a “physics-informed” machine learning approach to infer these disorder characteristics indirectly. This was based on how the internal disorder affected the flow of electrons through the device.

Lead researcher Associate Professor Natalia Ares (Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford) said: ‘As an analogy, when we play “crazy golf” the ball may enter a tunnel and exit with a speed or direction that doesn’t match our predictions. But with a few more shots, a crazy golf simulator, and some machine learning, we might get better at predicting the ball’s movements and narrow the reality gap.’

A representation of a quantum device and its internal disorder which influences measurement outcomes. Credit: David Craig/PRX.

Associate Professor Ares added: ‘In the crazy golf analogy, it would be equivalent to placing a series of sensors along the tunnel, so that we could take measurements of the ball’s speed at different points. Although we still can’t see inside the tunnel, we can use the data to inform better predictions of how the ball will behave when we take the shot.’

Not only did the new model find suitable internal disorder profiles to describe the measured current values, it was also able to accurately predict voltage settings required for specific device operating regimes.

Co-author David Craig.

Co-author David Craig, a PhD student at the Department of Materials, University of Oxford, added, ‘Similar to how we cannot observe black holes directly but we infer their presence from their effect on surrounding matter, we have used simple measurements as a proxy for the internal variability of nanoscale quantum devices. Although the real device still has greater complexity than the model can capture, our study has demonstrated the utility of using physics-aware machine learning to narrow the reality gap.’

The study 'Bridging the reality gap in quantum devices with physics-aware machine learning’ has been published in Physical Review X.

The source of this news is from University of Oxford

Popular in Research

1

Feb 5, 2024

New Prostate Cancer Report Card keeps treatment options simple to understand

2

1 week ago

Fifth cohort of Hansen Scholars join the University of Melbourne

3

Feb 3, 2024

NYU Production Lab Announces Six Projects for its 2024 Feature Film Development Studio

4

Feb 3, 2024

Five Tips for Outsmarting AI in Your Job Search

5

Feb 5, 2024

Innovative urban living concept tackles housing woes and offers socially connected solutions

Roundup of Key Statements

Oct 14, 2023

New path facilitates campus access for students

Feb 2, 2023