Bowtie resonators that build themselves bridge the gap between nanoscopic and macroscopic

December 07, 2023

Two separate approachesOne approach – the top-down approach – is behind the spectacular development we have seen with silicon-based semiconductor technologies. Here, crudely put, you go from a silicon block and work on making nanostructures from them. The other approach – the bottom-up approach – is where you try to have a nanotechnological system assemble itself. It aims to mimic biological systems, such as plants or animals, built through biological or chemical processes. We use the new self-assembly concept for photonic resonators, which may be used in electronics, nanorobotics, sensors, quantum technologies, and much more.

Two separate approaches

One approach – the top-down approach – is behind the spectacular development we have seen with silicon-based semiconductor technologies. Here, crudely put, you go from a silicon block and work on making nanostructures from them. The other approach – the bottom-up approach – is where you try to have a nanotechnological system assemble itself. It aims to mimic biological systems, such as plants or animals, built through biological or chemical processes. These two approaches are at the very core of what defines nanotechnology. But the problem is that these two approaches were so far disconnected: Semiconductors are scalable but cannot reach the atomic scale, and while self-assembled structures have long been operating at atomic scales, they offer no architecture for the interconnects to the external world.

“The interesting thing would be if we could produce an electronic circuit that built itself—just like what happens with humans as they grow but with inorganic semiconductor materials. That would be true hierarchical self-assembly. We use the new self-assembly concept for photonic resonators, which may be used in electronics, nanorobotics, sensors, quantum technologies, and much more. Then, we would really be able to harvest the full potential of nanotechnology. The research community is many breakthroughs away from realizing that vision, but I hope we have taken the first steps,” says Guillermo Arregui, who co-supervised the project.

Approaches converging

Supposing a combination of the two approaches is possible, the team at DTU Electro set out to create nanostructures that surpass the limits of conventional lithography and etching despite using nothing more than conventional lithography and etching. Their idea was to use two surface forces, namely the Casimir force for attracting the two halves and the van der Waals force for making them stick together. These two forces are rooted in the same underlying effect: quantum fluctuations (see Fact box). 

 

The source of this news is from Technical University of Denmark

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