Risky business

September 08, 2023

Two of the creators, Jessica Bland and Haydn Belfield set out to create a resource which allows people to connect to the research being carried out at CSER. “We're really focused on how in the 21st century, we reduce or mitigate those threats to humanity,” says Bland. “But of course, that's a pursuit that we've had for hundreds of years. “Some forms of those narratives put people off thinking about the issue because they're scary which is not our aim,” adds Bland. The map is now live (Friday 8 September) and will be accessible via Google Maps.

Two of the creators, Jessica Bland and Haydn Belfield set out to create a resource which allows people to connect to the research being carried out at CSER.

“We're really focused on how in the 21st century, we reduce or mitigate those threats to humanity,” says Bland. “But of course, that's a pursuit that we've had for hundreds of years. And Cambridge has been a hub for some of the key stories”.

Each landmark on the map offers the chance for reflection. For example, there are two nuclear bunkers in Cambridge - built in 1958 and 1983 –to protect regional government and the council, not the wider public, but why when in countries such as Switzerland all large residential complexes have their own bunker?

Belfield points out that the landmarks are “not just points of triumph and disaster, but one of discussion and reflection.”

As such each location on the map has a question. Some to encourage us to “Google” and read more around the subject, others to make us think about what we would do if we were faced with such risks.

“Some forms of those narratives put people off thinking about the issue because they're scary which is not our aim,” adds Bland.

Landmarks highlighted in the trial include the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens which saw the highest temperature ever recorded in Cambridge in 2022 as well as green spaces we walk through every day such as Midsummer Common where burial sites dating from both the 17th and 14th century plague outbreaks in Cambridge have been discovered.

The map is now live (Friday 8 September) and will be accessible via Google Maps. Bookmark this page and we’ll post the link here!

The source of this news is from University of Cambridge