Brainiacs Episode 11: Hidden Lead Contamination, A Smarter Search Algorithm, and Better Antivirals

October 06, 2023

“There is an urgent need for antiviral agents that act in new ways to inactivate viruses,” says NYU chemistry professor Kent Kirshenbaum. “Ideally, new antivirals won’t be specific to one virus or protein, so they will be ready to treat new viruses that emerge without delay and will be able to overcome the development of resistance.” Kirshembaum and colleagues showed how a group of novel molecules inspired by our own immune system inactivates several viruses, including Zika and chikungunya. Their approach may not only lead to drugs that can be used against many viruses, but could also help overcome antiviral resistance.

“There is an urgent need for antiviral agents that act in new ways to inactivate viruses,” says NYU chemistry professor Kent Kirshenbaum. “Ideally, new antivirals won’t be specific to one virus or protein, so they will be ready to treat new viruses that emerge without delay and will be able to overcome the development of resistance.” Kirshembaum and colleagues showed how a group of novel molecules inspired by our own immune system inactivates several viruses, including Zika and chikungunya. Their approach may not only lead to drugs that can be used against many viruses, but could also help overcome antiviral resistance.

The source of this news is from New York University